Caregiver Project for Seniors

 

HOW THE PROJECT CAN HELP:
The aim of the Caregiver Project for Seniors is to help maximize autonomy, capacity, and resiliency of individuals who are primary caregivers of older adults who need support to continue living at home.

The Caregiver Project for Seniors is operated by the Alzheimer Society of Toronto but is a non-disease specific program, meaning that the caregiver may be providing care to an individual with any kind of disability or physical/medical need.

 

WHAT THE PROJECT PROVIDES:
The unique aspect of this program is the self-directed care component, meaning that caregivers are able to identify their priorities and direct the support and funds based on their needs. This could include:

  • Counseling
  • Education
  • Enhanced system navigation
  • Small grants (provided eligibility criteria is met)

 

OBTAINING A REFERRAL:
The critical starting point is the conversation between the referral partner (care coordinator/social worker) and the caregiver, aimed at exploring the kind of support that the caregiver believes would help to relieve their distress. Eligibility is determined at the point of the assessment by the individual making the referral.

Referrals for this program are received from the following organizations representing the diverse geography and population of caregivers and older adults living in Toronto, including:

  • Alzheimer Society of Toronto
  • Mount Sinai
  • Reitman Centre Carers Program
  • St. Clair West Services for Seniors
  • St. Stephen’s Community House
  • West Neighbourhood House (formerly St. Christopher House)
  • Centre D’Accueil Heritage
  • Toronto Central CCAC.

The Caregiver Framework for Seniors Program is funded with support from the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network

 


 

Alzheimer Counselling and Financial Support Program

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAM:
The Alzheimer’s Counselling and Financial Support Program is funded by the George C. Hunt Family Foundation to provide counselling, support and individualized funding packages to up to 100 individuals with dementia and their families each year.

 

WHAT THIS PROGRAM PROVIDES:
The unique aspect of this program is the self-directed care component, meaning that caregivers are able to identify their priorities and direct the support and funds based on their needs. This could include:

  • Counseling
  • Education
  • Enhanced system navigation
  • Small grants (provided eligibility criteria is met)

 

OBTAINING A REFERRAL:
Referrals to this program are only made through social workers at the Alzheimer Society of Toronto. The critical starting point is the conversation between social worker and the caregiver (or person in the early stages of dementia) and is aimed at exploring the kind of support that the caregiver/person with dementia believes would help to relieve their distress.

Eligibility is determined at the point of the assessment by the individual making the referral.